Olathe, Johnson County, Kansas, USA



 


Notizen: Wikipedia 2016:
Olathe is a city in and is the county seat of Johnson County, Kansas, United States. Located in northeastern Kansas, it is also the fourth most populous city in the state, with a population of 125,872 at the 2010 census. Olathe is also the fourth-largest city in the Kansas City metropolitan area. It is bordered by the cities of Lenexa to the north, Overland Park to the east, De Soto to the northwest, and Gardner to the southwest.
History:
Olathe was founded by Dr. John T. Barton in the spring of 1857. He rode to the center of Johnson County, Kansas, and staked two quarter sections of land as the town site. He later described his ride to friends: "...the prairie was covered with verbena and other wild flowers. I kept thinking the land was beautiful and that I should name the town Beautiful." Purportedly, Barton asked a Shawnee interpreter how to say "Beautiful" in his native language. The interpreter responded, "Olathe."
Olathe was incorporated as a city in 1857.
While Olathe was not the first city established in Johnson County, it quickly became the largest and was named the county seat in October 1859. The city's early days were filled with violence, as pro-slavery forces from nearby Missouri often clashed with local abolitionists. These conflicts were known on a large scale as Bleeding Kansas.
As the 1850s came to a close, and as Kansas entered the Union as a free state in 1861, the violence lessened. However, a year later Confederate guerrillas from Missouri led by William Quantrill surprised the residents and raided the city on September 7, 1862, killing a half dozen men, robbing numerous businesses and private homes, and destroying most of the city. Quantrill launched the raid because the people of Olathe were known for their abolitionism. Throughout the Civil War a military post operated in Olathe. The post probably was established in 1861 and was located on the public square on which the Johnson County Courthouse has sat since that time. In March 1862 one company of troops were known to have been stationed there. When Quantrill raided Olathe on September 6, 1862, more than 125 Union soldiers, almost all of them recruits, were there. These surrendered to Quantrill and were compelled by Quantrill to take an oath forbidding them from taking up arms against the Confederacy. It was decided in November the recruits and soldiers in Olathe could not be compelled to obey oaths extracted by guerrillas, as such forces were not recognized as legitimate enemy military units.
Kansas militia occupied the Olathe military post through much of the Civil War and Army troops were there much of the time, as well. Twice more Olathe was threatened by Confederates. On August 20–21, 1863, Quantrill again passed through the area when he raided Lawrence, Kansas. (See Lawrence Massacre for more on this.) Many Union troops on those two days moved into and out of Olathe. The second time was on October 24-5, 1864, when Confederate Maj. Gen. Sterling Price and a force of 10,000 men passed the area on their retreat south. (See Price's Raid for more about this.)
The military post existed beyond the end of the Civil War, being deactivated probably in August 1865.
Olathe served as a stop on the Oregon Trail, the California Trail, and the Santa Fe Trail. Catering to travelers was the main source of income for local stores and businesses. The Mahaffie House, a popular resupply point for wagons headed westward, is today a registered historical site maintained by the City of Olathe. The staff wears period costumes, and stagecoach rides and farm animals make the site a favorite among children. Visitors participate a Civil War re-enactment, Wild West Days, and other activities there.
After the construction of the transcontinental railroad, the trails to the west lost importance, and Olathe faded into obscurity and remained a small, sleepy prairie town.
In the 1950s, the construction of the Interstate Highway system and, more directly, I-35, linked Olathe directly to nearby Kansas City. The result was tremendous residential growth as Olathe became a part of the Kansas City metropolitan area. In the 1980s, Olathe experienced tremendous commercial growth, which also drew more residents. It is estimated that Olathe's population surpassed 100,000 in 2001, and current projections show Olathe's growth continuing as the city expands into the farm fields south, west and north of town.
In 2008, the US Census Bureau ranked Olathe the 24th fastest-growing city in the nation. The same year, CNN/Money and Money magazine ranked Olathe #11 on its list of the "100 Best Cities to Live in the United States."

OpenStreetMap

Ort : Geographische Breite: 38.8813958, Geographische Länge: -94.81912849999998


Begraben

Treffer 1 bis 1 von 1

   Nachname, Taufnamen    Begraben    Personen-Kennung 
1 Grenz, Margaret  14 Feb 2000Olathe, Johnson County, Kansas, USA I118371

Verheiratet

Treffer 1 bis 2 von 2

   Familie    Verheiratet    Familien-Kennung 
1 Conroy / Veach  13 Jun 1947Olathe, Johnson County, Kansas, USA F25736
2 Scheerer / Hughes  18 Jan 1947Olathe, Johnson County, Kansas, USA F51914