New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA



 


Notizen: Wikipedia 2015:
New Orleans is a major United States port and the largest city and metropolitan area in the state of Louisiana. The population of the city was 343,829 as of the 2010 U.S. Census. The New Orleans metropolitan area (New Orleans–Metairie–Kenner Metropolitan Statistical Area) had a population of 1,167,764 in 2010 and was the 46th largest in the United States. The New Orleans–Metairie–Bogalusa Combined Statistical Area, a larger trading area, had a 2010 population of 1,452,502.
The city is named after the Duke of Orleans, who reigned as Regent for Louis XV from 1715 to 1723, as it was established by French colonists and strongly influenced by their European culture. It is well known for its distinct French and Spanish Creole architecture, as well as its cross-cultural and multilingual heritage. New Orleans is also famous for its cuisine, music (particularly as the birthplace of jazz), and its annual celebrations and festivals, most notably Mardi Gras, dating to French colonial times. The city is often referred to as the "most unique" in the United States.
New Orleans is located in southeastern Louisiana, straddling the Mississippi River. The city and Orleans Parish are coterminous. The city and parish are bounded by the parishes of St. Tammany to the north, St. Bernard to the east, Plaquemines to the south, and Jefferson to the south and west. Lake Pontchartrain, part of which is included in the city limits, lies to the north and Lake Borgne lies to the east.
Before Hurricane Katrina, Orleans Parish was the most populous parish in Louisiana. It now ranks third in population, trailing neighboring Jefferson Parish and East Baton Rouge Parish.
History:
La Nouvelle-Orleans (New Orleans) was founded May 7, 1718, by the French Mississippi Company, under the direction of Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne de Bienville, on land inhabited by the Chitimacha. It was named for Philippe d'Orleans, Duke of Orléans, who was Regent of the Kingdom of France at the time. His title came from the French city of Orleans.
The French colony was ceded to the Spanish Empire in the Treaty of Paris (1763). During the American Revolutionary War, New Orleans was an important port for smuggling aid to the rebels, transporting military equipment and supplies up the Mississippi River. Bernardo de Gálvez y Madrid, Count of Gálvez successfully launched a southern campaign against the British from the city in 1779. New Orleans (Spanish: Nueva Orleans) remained under Spanish control until 1801, when it reverted briefly to French oversight. Nearly all of the surviving 18th-century architecture of the Vieux Carré (French Quarter) dates from the Spanish period, the most notable exception being the Old Ursuline Convent.
Napoleon sold Louisiana (New France) to the United States in the Louisiana Purchase in 1803. Thereafter, the city grew rapidly with influxes of Americans, French, Creoles, and Africans. Later immigrants were Irish, Germans, and Italians. Major commodity crops of sugar and cotton were cultivated with slave labor on large plantations outside the city.
The Haitian Revolution ended in 1804 and established the second republic in the Western Hemisphere and the first republic led by black people. It had occurred over several years in what was then the French colony of Saint-Domingue. Thousands of refugees from the revolution, both whites and free people of color (affranchis or gens de couleur libres), arrived in New Orleans, often bringing African slaves with them. While Governor Claiborne and other officials wanted to keep out additional free black men, the French Creoles wanted to increase the French-speaking population. As more refugees were allowed in Louisiana, Haitian emigres who had first gone to Cuba also arrived. Many of the white Francophones had been deported by officials in Cuba in retaliation for Bonapartist schemes in Spain.
Nearly 90 percent of these immigrants settled in New Orleans. The 1809 migration brought 2,731 whites; 3,102 free persons of African descent; and 3,226 enslaved persons of African descent, doubling the city's population. The city became 63 percent black in population, a greater proportion than Charleston, South Carolina's 53 percent.
During the final campaign of the War of 1812, the British sent a force of 11,000 soldiers, marines, and sailors, in an attempt to capture New Orleans. Despite great challenges, General Andrew Jackson, with support from the U.S. Navy on the river, successfully cobbled together a motley military force of: militia from Louisiana and Mississippi, including free men of color, U.S. Army regulars, a large contingent of Tennessee state militia, Kentucky riflemen, Choctaw fighters, and local privateers (the latter led by the pirate Jean Lafitte), to decisively defeat the British troops, led by Sir Edward Pakenham, in the Battle of New Orleans on January 8, 1815. The armies had not learned that the Treaty of Ghent had officially ended the war on December 24, 1814. The fighting in Louisiana had begun in December 1814 and did not end until late January, after the Americans held off the British Navy during a ten-day siege of Fort St. Philip. (The Royal Navy went on to capture Fort Bowyer near Mobile, before the commanders received news of the peace treaty.)
As a principal port, New Orleans played a major role during the antebellum era in the Atlantic slave trade. Its port also handled huge quantities of commodities for export from the interior and imported goods from other countries, which were warehoused and transferred in New Orleans to smaller vessels and distributed the length and breadth of the vast Mississippi River watershed. The river in front of the city was filled with steamboats, flatboats, and sailing ships. Despite its role in the slave trade, New Orleans at the same time had the largest and most prosperous community of free persons of color in the nation, who were often educated and middle-class property owners.
Dwarfing in population the other cities in the antebellum South, New Orleans had the largest slave market in the domestic slave trade, which expanded after the United States' ending of the international trade in 1808. Two-thirds of the more than one million slaves brought to the Deep South arrived via the forced migration of the domestic slave trade. The money generated by the sale of slaves in the Upper South has been estimated at 15 percent of the value of the staple crop economy. The slaves represented half a billion dollars in property. An ancillary economy grew up around the trade in slaves—for transportation, housing and clothing, fees, etc., estimated at 13.5 percent of the price per person. All of this amounted to tens of billions of dollars (2005 dollars, adjusted for inflation) during the antebellum period, with New Orleans as a prime beneficiary.
According to the historian Paul Lachance,
the addition of white immigrants [from Saint-Domingue] to the white creole population enabled French-speakers to remain a majority of the white population until almost 1830. If a substantial proportion of free persons of color and slaves had not also spoken French, however, the Gallic community would have become a minority of the total population as early as 1820.
After the Louisiana Purchase, numerous Anglo-Americans migrated to the city. The population of the city doubled in the 1830s and by 1840, New Orleans had become the wealthiest and the third-most populous city in the nation. Large numbers of German and Irish immigrants began arriving in the 1840s, working as laborers in the busy port. In this period, the state legislature passed more restrictions on manumissions of slaves, and virtually ended it in 1852.
In the 1850s, white Francophones remained an intact and vibrant community; they maintained instruction in French in two of the city's four school districts (all were white). In 1860, the city had 13,000 free people of color (gens de couleur libres), the class of free, mostly mixed-race people that developed during French and Spanish rule. The census recorded 81 percent as mulatto, a term used to cover all degrees of mixed race. Mostly part of the Francophone group, they constituted the artisan, educated and professional class of African Americans. Most blacks were still enslaved, working at the port, in domestic service, in crafts, and mostly on the many large, surrounding sugar cane plantations.
After growing by 45 percent in the 1850s, by 1860, the city had nearly 170,000 people The city was a destination for immigrants. It had grown in wealth, with a "per capita income [that] was second in the nation and the highest in the South." The city had a role as the "primary commercial gateway for the nation's booming mid-section." The port was the third largest in the nation in terms of tonnage of imported goods, after Boston and New York, handling 659,000 tons in 1859.
As the French Creole elite feared, during the Civil War their world changed. In 1862, following the occupation by the Navy after the Battle of Forts Jackson and St. Philip, Northern forces under Gen. Benjamin F. Butler, a respected state lawyer of the Massachusetts militia, occupied the City. Later New Orleans residents nicknamed him as "Beast" Butler, because of a military order he issued. After his troops had been assaulted and harassed in the streets by Southern women, his order warned that future such occurrences would result in his men treating such "ladies" as those "plying their avocation in the streets," implying that they would treat the women like prostitutes. Accounts of this spread like wildfire across the South and the North. He also came to be called "Spoons" Butler because of the alleged looting that his troops did while occupying New Orleans.
Butler abolished French language instruction in city schools; statewide measures in 1864 and, after the war, 1868 further strengthened English-only policy imposed by federal representatives. With the predominance of English speakers in the city and state, that language had already become dominant in business and government. By the end of the 19th century, French usage in the city had faded significantly; it was also under pressure from new immigrants: English speakers such as the Irish, and other Europeans, such as the Italians and Germans. However, as late as 1902 "one-fourth of the population of the city spoke French in ordinary daily intercourse, while another two-fourths was able to understand the language perfectly," and as late as 1945, one still encountered elderly Creole women who spoke no English. The last major French language newspaper in New Orleans, L’Abeille de la Nouvelle-Orleans (New Orleans Bee), ceased publication on December 27, 1923, after ninety-six years. According to some sources, Le Courrier de la Nouvelle Orleans continued until 1955.
As the city was captured and occupied early in the war, it was spared the destruction through warfare suffered by many other cities of the American South. The Union Army eventually extended its control north along the Mississippi River and along the coastal areas of the State. As a result, most of the southern portion of Louisiana was originally exempted from the liberating provisions of the 1863 "Emancipation Proclamation" issued by President Abraham Lincoln.
Large numbers of rural ex-slaves and some free people of color from the City volunteered for the first regiments of Black troops in the War. Led by Brig. Gen. Daniel Ullman (1810-1892), of the 78th Regiment of New York State Volunteers Militia, they were known as the "Corps d'Afrique." While that name had been used by a militia before the war, that group was composed of free people of color. The new group was made up mostly of former slaves. They were supplemented in the last two years of the War by newly organized United States Colored Troops, who played an increasingly important part in the war.
Violence throughout the South, especially the Memphis Riots of 1866 followed by the New Orleans Riot in July of that year, resulted in Congress passing the Reconstruction Act and the Fourteenth Amendment, to extend the protections of full citizenship to freedmen and free people of color. Louisiana and Texas were put under the authority of the "Fifth Military District" of the United States during Reconstruction. Louisiana was eventually readmitted to the Union in 1868; its Constitution of 1868 granted universal manhood suffrage and established universal public education. Both blacks and whites were elected to local and state offices. In 1872, lieutenant governor P.B.S. Pinchback, who was of mixed race, succeeded Henry Clay Warmouth for a brief period as Republican governor of Louisiana, becoming the first governor of African descent of an American state. The next African American to serve as governor was Douglas Wilder, elected in Virginia in 1989. For a time, New Orleans operated a racially integrated public school system.
Wartime damage to levees and cities along the Mississippi River adversely affected southern crops and trade for the port city for some time. The federal government contributed to restoring infrastructure, but it took time. The nationwide financial recession and Panic of 1873 also adversely affected businesses and slowed economic recovery.
From 1868, elections in Louisiana were marked by violence, as white insurgents tried to suppress black voting and disrupt Republican gatherings. Violence continued around elections. The disputed 1872 gubernatorial election resulted in conflicts that ran for years. The "White League", an insurgent paramilitary group that supported the Democratic Party, was organized in 1874 and operated in the open, violently suppressing the black vote and running off Republican officeholders. In 1874, in the Battle of Liberty Place, 5,000 members of the White League fought with city police to take over the state offices for the Democratic candidate for governor, holding them for three days. By 1876, such tactics resulted in the white Democrats, the so-called Redeemers, regaining political control of the state legislature. The federal government gave up and withdrew its troops in 1877, ending Reconstruction.
White Democrats passed Jim Crow laws, establishing racial segregation in public facilities. In 1889, the legislature passed a constitutional amendment incorporating a "grandfather clause" that effectively disfranchised freedmen as well as the propertied people of color free before the war. Unable to vote, African Americans could not serve on juries or in local office, and were closed out of formal politics for several generations in the state. It was ruled by a white Democratic Party. Public schools were racially segregated and remained so until 1960.
New Orleans' large community of well-educated, often French-speaking free persons of color (gens de couleur libres), who had been free prior to the Civil War, sought to fight back against Jim Crow. They organized the Comité du Citoyens (Citizens Committee) to work for civil rights. As part of their legal campaign, they recruited one of their own, Homer Plessy, to test whether Louisiana's newly enacted Separate Car Act was constitutional. Plessy boarded a commuter train departing New Orleans for Covington, Louisiana, sat in the car reserved for whites only, and was arrested. The case resulting from this incident, Plessy v. Ferguson, was heard by the U.S. Supreme Court in 1896. The court ruled that "separate but equal" accommodations were constitutional, effectively upholding Jim Crow measures. In practice, African-American public schools and facilities were underfunded in Louisiana and across the South. The Supreme Court ruling contributed to this period as the nadir of race relations in the United States. The rate of lynchings of black men was high across the South, as other states also disfranchised blacks and sought to impose Jim Crow to establish white supremacy.
Throughout New Orleans' history, until the early 20th century when medical and scientific advances ameliorated the situation, the city suffered repeated epidemics of yellow fever and other tropical and infectious diseases.
New Orleans' zenith as an economic and population center, in relation to other American cities, occurred in the decades prior to 1860. At this time New Orleans was the nation's fifth-largest city and was significantly larger than all other American South population centers. New Orleans continued to increase in population from the mid-19th century onward, but rapid economic growth shifted to other areas of the country, meaning that New Orleans' relative importance steadily declined. First to emerge in importance were the new industrial and railroad hubs of the Midwest, then the rapidly growing metropolises of the Pacific Coast in the decades before and after the turn of the 20th century. In the post-World War II period, other Sun Belt cities in the South and West surpassed New Orleans in population. Construction of railways and highways decreased river traffic, diverting goods to other transportation corridors and markets. Thousands of the most ambitious blacks left New Orleans and the state in the Great Migration around World War II and after, many for West Coast destinations.
From the late 1800s, most U.S. censuses recorded New Orleans' slipping rank among American cities. Reminded every ten years of its declining relative importance, New Orleans would periodically mount attempts to regain its economic vigor and pre-eminence, with varying degrees of success.
By the mid-20th century, New Orleanians recognized that their city was being surpassed as the leading urban area in the South. By 1950, Houston, Dallas and Atlanta exceeded New Orleans in size, and in 1960 Miami eclipsed New Orleans, even as the latter's population reached what would be its historic peak that year. As with other older American cities in the postwar period, highway construction and suburban development drew residents from the center city to newer housing outside. The 1970 census recorded the first absolute decline in the city's population since it joined the United States. The New Orleans metropolitan area continued expanding in population, however, just not as rapidly as other major cities in the Sun Belt. While the port remained one of the largest in the nation, automation and containerization resulted in significant job losses. The city's relative fall in stature meant that its former role as banker to the South was inexorably supplanted by competing companies in larger peer cities. New Orleans' economy had always been based more on trade and financial services than on manufacturing, but the city's relatively small manufacturing sector also shrank in the post–World War II period. Despite some economic development successes under the administrations of DeLesseps "Chep" Morrison (1946–1961) and Victor "Vic" Schiro (1961–1970), metropolitan New Orleans' growth rate consistently lagged behind more vigorous cities.

OpenStreetMap

Ort : Geographische Breite: 29.95106579999999, Geographische Länge: -90.0715323


Geburt

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   Nachname, Taufnamen    Geburt    Personen-Kennung 
1 Bacas, Adelaida  20 Jan 1817New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I31403
2 Bacas, Adelaide  24 Dez 1839New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I31419
3 Bacas, Barthelemy  15 Aug 1780New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I31398
4 Bacas, Barthelemy  18 Jun 1838New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I31418
5 Bacas, Bernadette  27 Dez 1876New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I31461
6 Bacas, Cecile  17 Nov 1847New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I31433
7 Bacas, Clarance Bernard  8 Okt 1887New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I31463
8 Bacas, Drauzin Valsin  6 Sep 1813New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I31402
9 Bacas, Drauzin Valsin  10 Jun 1842New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I31420
10 Bacas, Elisabeth Celina  um 1830New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I31408
11 Bacas, Eugene  16 Mrz 1847New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I31422
12 Bacas, Felicie Marie Joseph  20 Jun 1820New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I31405
13 Bacas, Felix  8 Aug 1823New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I31407
14 Bacas, Genevieve  3 Jan 1850New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I31434
15 Bacas, Henry  8 Sep 1838New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I31429
16 Bacas, Jean Baptiste Valcour  19 Jul 1812New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I31251
17 Bacas, Joseph Anatole  6 Dez 1839New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I31457
18 Bacas, Joseph Valmont  um 1806New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I31400
19 Bacas, Laure  19 Sep 1849New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I31423
20 Bacas, Leon  19 Jul 1785New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I31444
21 Bacas, Louis Adhemar  um 1833New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I31409
22 Bacas, Louise  21 Okt 1840New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I31430
23 Bacas, Louise Josephine  18 Nov 1836New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I31428
24 Bacas, Lucien  19 Jan 1845New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I31421
25 Bacas, Luisa  11 Mai 1809New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I31401
26 Bacas, Maria  23 Apr 1842New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I31431
27 Bacas, Maria Josepha  10 Jun 1819New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I31404
28 Bacas, Paul  29 Jul 1844New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I31432
29 Bacas, Paul Leo  13 Jan 1883New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I31462
30 Bacas, Renaldo  14 Apr 1778New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I31442
31 Bacas, Unbekannt  2 Dez 1795New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I31445
32 Baccus, Charles Emmanuel  6 Mrz 1842New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I31286
33 Baccus, John Bernard Jr.  24 Dez 1840New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I31285
34 Baccus, Louise Victoria  12 Jan 1845New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I31287
35 Baccus, Mary M.  9 Nov 1852New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I31291
36 Baccus, Richard Thomas  25 Mrz 1843New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I26618
37 Beaulieu, Adelaide Puponne  um 1783New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I31399
38 Correjolles, Claire Adele  4 Feb 1914New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I168976
39 Gemar, Adline  19 Sep 1879New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I168992
40 Gemar, Anna Lena  26 Okt 1885New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I168936
41 Gemar, Catherine  4 Mrz 1855New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I168940
42 Gemar, Charles  Dez 1868New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I168983
43 Gemar, Conrad Philip  5 Dez 1975New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I168987
44 Gemar, Frank  19 Mrz 1871New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I168985
45 Gemar, Frank  30 Jan 1890New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I168938
46 Gemar, Jacob  Nov 1866New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I168982
47 Gemar, Johann Philipp  31 Dez 1856New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I168933
48 Gemar, John Alfred  5 Nov 1883New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I168935
49 Gemar, Katherine  13 Dez 1898New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I168989
50 Gemar, Louis Ludewig  13 Aug 1873New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I168986

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Getauft

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   Nachname, Taufnamen    Getauft    Personen-Kennung 
1 Bacas, Adelaida  27 Mai 1817New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA I31403
2 Bacas, Juan Bautista  13 Nov 1809New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I31447
3 Bacas, Maria Josepha  22 Apr 1820New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I31404

Gestorben

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   Nachname, Taufnamen    Gestorben    Personen-Kennung 
1 Albert, Conrad  13 Dez 1906New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I168941
2 Bacas, Cecile  15 Jan 1849New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I31433
3 Bacas, Felix  27 Sep 1824New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I31407
4 Bacas, Genevieve  30 Mrz 1850New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I31434
5 Bacas, Jean Baptiste Manuel  7 Feb 1817New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I31440
6 Bacas, Joseph Valmont  28 Nov 1862New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I31400
7 Bacas, Louis Adhemar  2 Jul 1848New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I31409
8 Bacas, Louise Josephine  3 Dez 1837New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I31428
9 Bacas, Marie Luysa  9 Apr 1809New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I31443
10 Bacas, Unbekannt  7 Dez 1795New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I31445
11 Beaulieu, Adelaide Puponne  24 Dez 1855New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I31399
12 Bush, Maud Lenora  20 Jan 1940New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I47645
13 Correjolles, John Henry  24 Sep 1960New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I168975
14 Crosby, Sarah Ann  Okt 1865New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I83930
15 Gemar, Adline  31 Mrz 1939New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I168992
16 Gemar, Catherine  26 Jul 1927New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I168940
17 Gemar, Charles  18 Jun 1939New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I168983
18 Gemar, Conrad Philip  2 Jun 1964New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I168987
19 Gemar, Frank  13 Mrz 1921New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I168985
20 Gemar, Jacob  15 Okt 1913New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I168982
21 Gemar, Johann Philipp  23 Jan 1903New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I4092
22 Gemar, Johann Philipp  4 Apr 1908New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I168933
23 Gemar, Louis Ludewig  5 Okt 1926New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I168986
24 Gemar, Philip  14 Okt 1938New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I168991
25 Kruppenbacher, Anna Katherine  8 Sep 1969New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I168988
26 Landrony, Honore  23 Jan 1725New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I31486
27 Landrony, Louise Catherine  16 Okt 1773New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I31467
28 Landrony, Marie Louise Catherine  21 Dez 1796New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I31441
29 Landrum, R.J.  1865New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I83938
30 Livermore, Hortaire Paul  29 Mai 1866New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I31416
31 Offenberg, Louis Francois Jean  13 Apr 1849New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I31256
32 Pardee, Malcolm Ives Chamberlain  Aug 1940New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I47646
33 Reisch, Magdalena  5 Nov 1924New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I168939
34 Rüß, Sybilla  nach 1843New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA I155339
35 Saulay, Charles  15 Dez 1859New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I31396
36 Shakespeare, Lenora L.  3 Sep 1927New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I47643
37 Sigsworth, Joseph  15 Sep 1945New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA I159006
38 Smeesters, Jeanette  14 Apr 1849New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I31254
39 Welker, Joseph John  13 Dez 1943New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I168990
40 Woeste, Elizabeth  30 Nov 1931New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  I168984

Verheiratet

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   Familie    Verheiratet    Familien-Kennung 
1 Bacas / Essayleme  um 1831New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  F10638
2 Bacas / Saulay  2 Mrz 1840New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  F10588
3 Gemar / Nereaux  1882New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  F56010
4 Landrony / Bonne  9 Mrz 1777New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  F10650
5 Le Rond / Bacas  11 Nov 1847New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  F10635
6 Livermore / Bacas  13 Okt 1858New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  F10636
7 Regnisse / Landrony  23 Jun 1766New Orleans, Orleans County, Louisiana, USA  F10651